How common is depression today?

Posted by KareOptionsTeam on February 24, 2021

When it comes to maintaining our physical health, everyone seems to have an elaborate and comprehensive diet and exercise plan We have all become more aware about the prevalence of chronic diseases like diabetes, hypertension, cancer, cardio-vascular diseases and stroke. We have seen our previous generations suffer through these illnesses and their side effects for several years now. Many people are becoming more conscious about reading the labels of the foods they buy at the grocery store; switching to organic fruits, cutting out dairy, gluten and sugar changing the kind of oil we use for cooking, eating low calorie snacks etc. We have also started to adopt some form of physical exercise example-Zumba, Pilates, spinning, yoga, running, working out at the gym etc.

However, the awareness of mental illness and treatment is surprisingly still low. Common illnesses such as neurotic disorders, personality and psychotic disorders are neglected and ignored. Depression is a psychological disorder that affects OVER 264 million people suffer worldwide which is equal to around 4.4% of the world’s population. It most commonly affects age group 15-44 years. World Health Organization (WHO) states that depression is the leading cause of disability as measured by Years Lived with Disability (YLDs) and the fourth leading contributor to the global burden of disease.

Who is most likely to get depressed?

Depression can and does affect people of all ages, from all walks of life, the risk of becoming depressed is increased by poverty, unemployment, life events such as the death of a loved one or a relationship break-up, physical illness and problems caused by alcohol and drug use. Common types of depression:

  1. Major depressive disorder
  2. Persistent depressive disorder
  3. Bipolar depression
  4. Post-partum depression
  5. Seasonal affective disorder
  6. Atypical depression

IN THE USA

According to data collected by the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) in 2017

  • 17.3 million Adults (7.1% of the adult population) have had at least one major depressive episode.
  • The prevalence of major depressive episode was higher among adult females (8.7%) compared to males (5.3%).
  • Suicide is one of the leading causes of death for 15- to 19-year-olds suffering from depression. Reports of suicide attempts among college students increased from 0.7% to 1.8% from 2013 to 2018.
  • Only two-thirds of the adults suffering from depression seek some form of treatment (professional and/or medication). On the other hand teenagers are less likely to get treatment for depression
  • Access to treatment, in the USA, depends on the sick person’s ability to pay, and patients are at the mercy of their medical insurance companies. Cost of consulting a private professional is quite high and a non-affording individual would have to search for low income services, support groups or sliding scale therapists to continue therapy.

When it comes to maintaining our physical health, everyone seems to have an elaborate and comprehensive diet and exercise plan We have all become more aware about the prevalence of chronic diseases like diabetes, hypertension, cancer, cardio-vascular diseases and stroke. We have seen our previous generations suffer through these illnesses and their side effects for several years now. Many people are becoming more conscious about reading the labels of the foods they buy at the grocery store; switching to organic fruits, cutting out dairy, gluten and sugar changing the kind of oil we use for cooking, eating low calorie snacks etc. We have also started to adopt some form of physical exercise example-Zumba, Pilates, spinning, yoga, running, working out at the gym etc.

However, the awareness of mental illness and treatment is surprisingly still low. Common illnesses such as neurotic disorders, personality and psychotic disorders are neglected and ignored. Depression is a psychological disorder that affects OVER 264 million people suffer worldwide which is equal to around 4.4% of the world’s population. It most commonly affects age group 15-44 years. World Health Organization (WHO) states that depression is the leading cause of disability as measured by Years Lived with Disability (YLDs) and the fourth leading contributor to the global burden of disease.

IN INDIA

According to data collected by National Mental Health Survey of India

  • NMHS has etimated that at any given point, nearly 23 million adults in India woulkd require care for depression.
  • Analysis of the studies conducted in high income states report significantly increased risk of depression/mood disorder in urban when compared with rural areas.
  • Factors such as physical, social, cultural, economic and macro-micro environmental factors like concentration of poverty, changes in the family structure, social isolation and loneliness, economic stress, work-life imbalance, substance use and others are associated with urban life patterns, which in turn might set a platform for higher prevalence of mental disorders.
  • South Asian and African region has the high proportion of people living in poverty. Cost of care associated with depression is estimated to be nearly one-sixth of the household, and this could have devastating effect on the family. Additionally, in the absence of state-sponsored or self-paid insurance coverage, depressive disorder could drive poor households to economic crisis, setting up a vicious cycle of poverty and mental disorder.
  • India also accounts for 36.6 per cent of suicides globally, and that suicide has surpassed maternal mortality as the leading cause of death among women and teenage girls aged 15-19 years
  • WHO also states that the mental health workforce in India is not up to the mark and there is a huge shortage of psychiatrists and psychologists in the country as compared to the number of people suffering from mental health issues.
  • With a growing population suffering from mental disorders, the government rescinded NMHP and introduced the Mental Healthcare Act of 2017. This new act laid the definition of mental illness. It recognised the rights of mentally sick patients to choose how they were to be treated, and decriminalised suicide.
    Recently, India has promised to partner with the USA to exchange information in combating the mental health crisis. Via the agreement, signed in February 2020, the USA has agreed to share its mental health research with India, while it gains access to traditional Indian medicine and therapy to counter mental illnesses.

OTHER COUNTRIES

  • 4-10% of people in England will experience depression in their lifetime.
  • Common mental health problems such as depression and anxiety are distributed according to a gradient of economic disadvantage across society. The poorer and more disadvantaged are disproportionately affected by common mental health problems and their adverse consequences.
  • In the UK, the National Health Service (NHS) is funded mainly by government direct taxation, and partially by the National Insurance system (a kind of Social Security contribution), and treatment is free at point of service to everyone. Mental health is available for free on the NHS in all three bands – children, adult, and the aged.
  • In Australia, the framework for mental health services is a highly complex mixture of public and private systems, with funding shared between the Australian, state and territory governments, individuals and private health insurers.
  • The most recent ABS National Health Survey estimated there were 4.8 million Australians (20.1 per cent) with a mental or behavioural condition in 2017–18. This was an increase of 2.6 percentage points from 2014–15, mainly due to an increase in the number of people reporting anxiety-related conditions, depression, or feelings of depression.
  • The rates of depression were similar in Canada (8.2%) and the United States (8.7%). However, U.S. respondents without medical insurance were twice as likely as Canadian respondents and U.S. respondents with medical insurance to meet the criteria for depression and not seek help. Medical insurance is a criteria for US citizens to seek treatment but that is not the case in Canada. In Canada, Government-funded hospitals provide low cost or free treatment where as private practice psychiatrists and psychologists charge a steep fee.

HERE AT KAREOPTIONS

Here at KareOptions we are determined to get you the kind of help you need through our: Second opinion service on your diagnosis or your prescribed line of treatment, we guide you to reach out to the best doctor for their expert opinion close to where you live. Our priorities finding the correct health care worker (psychiatrist/psychologist/counsellor according to your needs) recommending an effective, combined treatment plan, and in some cases identifying the best facilities for you to receive care. Every patient receives a personalized report. Written reports that provide a clear understanding of what is happening, a path for the future, providing continuous support and care throughout the course of your consultation with us. Second Opinion Board Review provides a holistic multidisciplinary review by experts on your diagnosis and treatment plan ( not just a psychiatrist but a psychologist, behaviour therapist, occupational therapist, family therapist, and a physician if required)

People suffering from chronic systemic illnesses (autoimmune disorders, arthritis, AIDS, cancer cerebral-vascular accidents, chronic renal failure etc.) also experience depression due to their disabilities/limitations. Often due to the intense focus on treatment of the disease family members and specialists fail to consider the mental status of the person suffering. We want to ensure your mental illness is taken seriously and considered as a holistic part of your treatment.